Wreck-onciliation Ralph

Posted: April 16, 2013 by Josh Kwasny in Action, Adventure, Animation, Comedy, Family
Tags: , , , , , , ,

wreckitralphdelted122019291201

Disney’s Wreck-It Ralph is rated F3 – fun family film. It especially appeals to those of us whose childhood included a steady diet of video games. (Many would say that this diet explains a lot of my issues)

Spoilers ahead!

Wreck-It Ralph is a story of a video game villain named (you guessed it) Ralph (John C. Reilly). Ralph becomes disillusioned with being a bad guy. Even after attending a support group for villains (one of the best scenes in the film), he decides to go on a quest to become a hero. He believes that by securing his very own medal he will finally be accepted into his video game community.

Wreck-It Ralph is creative and fun. It has many good messages to celebrate. Throughout the film we are encouraged to love others, have compassion, be content, and sacrifice for our friends. It is refreshing to see these qualities portrayed on the big screen. Unfortunately, these moral lessons have no real power in themselves. While still good advice to follow, without Jesus Christ, they provide little hope for Ralph to truly become what he was made to be.

Let me explain…

wreck-it-ralph-movie-quotes-10

One of the main themes (if not the main one) is that of personal contentment. “Be content with who you are” is an obvious take away from the film. Listen to the mantra of the villain support group…

“I am bad and that’s good.

I will never be good, and that’s not bad.

There’s no one I’d rather be than me.”

On the surface, this may seem like great advice. You can even “Christianize” it if you want – something like, “I just need to accept the way God made me.” While it is true that we should learn to understand our personalities, strengths, and weaknesses (and quite frankly, not take ourselves so seriously), this understanding can in no way provide the power to become who we were designed to be. The truth is that we are much worse than we think we are.

Wreck-It Ralph tells us to look inside for answers to our problems. The danger in this thinking is that we lack any real power to change what is broken. Ralph’s desire for acceptance and longing for community are good things – they are part of what it means to be human. The bad news is that these things are broken because of sin. The only hope for reconciliation with other people is found by being reconciled to God through Jesus Christ.

Sin destroyed true community. Because of sin we cannot be in true communion with God or with each other. Selfishness is at the core of sin. Isn’t this what happened in the Fall of mankind (Genesis 3)? Adam and Eve believed that they were better off without “the Man” keeping them down. They decided to go alone and make their own rules. As a result they were (we are) separated from relationship with God. Sin also destroyed authentic relationships with other people. Instead of working together for a common purpose, men and women now fight, manipulate, and compete. We all want to be accepted (like Ralph), but sin is a barrier that cannot be overcome by learning to love ourselves more.

Jesus Christ died not so that we could learn to accept ourselves as we are, but rather so that we can be changed into what we were created to be.

What is interesting is that Wreck-It Ralph illustrates this very thing. We see this in the character of Vanellope (Sarah Silverman). Vanellope, like Ralph is an outcast who desires to be accepted into her game community – “Sugar Rush” (a candy racing game). What is interesting is that we come to find out that she is an outcast only because the true villain, King Candy (Alan Tudyk), has distorted the original game code. Threatened by her true identity, King Candy deceives everyone into thinking that Vanellope is nothing but a “glitch” in the system – not a true part of the game.

As the story unfolds, Ralph and Vanellope come to realize that if Vanellope crosses the finish line of the race, the game will reset. This reboot will return the game to its original programming – with Vanellope as a true part of the “Sugar Rush” community. Ralph, along with Felix (Jack McBrayer) and Calhoun (Jane Lynch), helps Vanellope finish the race and return the game to its original state – exposing King Candy and revealing Vanellope as the princess of Candy Rush.

What I love about this is that Vanellope’s dramatic change (and the rest of the character’s as a result) comes through a “reboot.” The game needed to be reset to the original design. This drastic change has a ripple effect on the gaming world – restoring lost relationships and creating new communities of friendship and trust.

This is the story of the Gospel. Humanity cannot save itself. We need a “reboot.” We need some way to restore the world to its original design. God created us to be in relationship with Him and to be in relationship with other people.

We have no power in ourselves to repair the damage caused by sin. Jesus Christ entered human history to pay the price for our sin and restore our true identity. He renewed our relationship with God and made a way to be reconciled to others.

The apostle Paul put it like this:

17 Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come. 18 All this is from God, who through Christ reconciled us to himself and gave us the ministry of reconciliation; 19 that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation. 20 Therefore, we are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through us. We implore you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. 21 For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

(2 Corinthians 5:16-21, ESV)

In light of these verses, let me offer a Christian mantra…

“Because of sin I am bad, and that’s not good.

On my own I can’t be good, and that’s pretty bad.

But in Christ I am no longer bad, and that’s pretty good.

Now there is no one I’d rather be than the redeemed me.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s